Shirts

To understand deeply how comes that streetwear is so deeply in love with shirts we have to go back in time. Punks guided by Malcolm McLaren started wearing flannels made of kilt patterns, to make fun of the classic tartan clans and Scottish skirts, considering their anti establishment credo. Read more

To understand deeply how comes that streetwear is so deeply in love with shirts we have to go back in time. Punks guided by Malcolm McLaren started wearing flannels made of kilt patterns, to make fun of the classic tartan clans and Scottish skirts, considering their anti establishment credo. 

 

On the other side of the ocean, Californian punks were down with this garment too, tying them at the waist to make if fly during their stage diving time. It was a popular way of dressing from the street: workers felt that these shirts were warm so the step from workwear to streetwear is never too long. From Mexican gangsters wearing Dickies and Carhartt flannels to Suicidal Tendencies wearing them to state their official belonging to street life, flannels are easy to wear and give a rugged image.

Another type of shirt that was getting love of punks and skaters was the surplus army green or camouflage shirt. Back then you copped them from thrift shop, nowadays you have brands like Dickies that carries camo shirts but also adidas Skateboarding and even Italian conceptual brand Iuter. In mid 80s hardcore punk fans where also used to wear the shirt with a hoodie beneath. 

Then, a few years later, the fascination with checkered shirts expanded to another workwear item: the denim shirt. Part skinhead heritage, part workwear item, these three shirts were the only ones on the streets for a long time with Levi's  as the only brand allowed. 

Later on, when skaters took over the streets and their image started to get cleaner, a new option was available thanks to Nike SB: pile fabric. In this way you could stay in the streets all the time without restrictions to your movement but most of all without being cold. Nike SB was mostly responsible to bring into streetwear the chambray shirt, immediately loved by skaters with the clean image.

Beside punks and skaters hip hop fans too loved to see Eazy E, Ice Cube and Cypress Hill rocking flannels and same was for those on the East Coast when they saw the Beastie Boys wearing them. It's not a matter of wearing a shirt therefor, it's always a matter of how you wear it.

move shop filter

0 items found

There are no products that match the filters you have selected, try to delete some or use the search on the site.

Move Shop

Headquarters: Viale dell'Industria, 38 - 37135 Verona, IT
Shop: Corso Cavour, 25/27 - 37121 Verona, IT

VAT number IT04264340235

Information

metodo di pagamento
Trustpilot